“Stranger in the Shogun’s City” by Amy Stanley

cover187412-medium

Thanks to Random House UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

Anyone who reads and researches a lot about Japan knows that there isn’t much tangible social history about those outwith the nobility. This book seeks to shine some light onto a life of an “ordinary” Japanese woman coming of age in the early 19th century. This was a time of huge political and social change in Japan and it was still largely closed off from the wider world and the social and cultural influences of the time. I say “ordinary” because Tsuneno was still rather privileged by the standards of the time, at the beginning of her life at least.

Continue reading ““Stranger in the Shogun’s City” by Amy Stanley”

“The Tenth Muse” by Catherine Chung

cover172595-medium

Thanks to Little Brown and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review. 

This book made me feel interested in and enthused about Maths which is really saying a lot. I know a lot of people say they hate Maths but I don’t, I just really, really struggle to understand it. A friend of mine who is now a Professor of Mathematics once told me to think of it like a language. Little did he know that I am crap at languages too.

Anyway, this book is something rather special. I was worried that it was going to be one of those awfully clever books that makes me feel thick, but I was pleasantly surprised (and relieved!). 

Continue reading ““The Tenth Muse” by Catherine Chung”

“Hamnet” by Maggie O’Farrell

cover187292-medium

Thanks to Headline and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review. 

My husband and I have this thing where if we come across something amazing, be it a movie, song, book or even a person, we call it a “Crocodile Rock”. A Crocodile Rock (named after the Elton John song obvs) is something or someone truly amazing. God tier if you will. The Count of Monte Cristo is a Crocodile Rock. Keanu Reeves is a Crocodile Rock. Mozart’s Dies Irae is a Crocodile Rock. Botticelli’s Birth of Venus is a Crocodile Rock. 

You get the concept. 

Continue reading ““Hamnet” by Maggie O’Farrell”

“Mudlarking” by Lara Maiklem

Thanks to Bloomsbury Publishing and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

So as anyone can see I’m completely behind with my blogging. There are various reasons for it that I won’t bore you with but suffice to say, I would have much preferred to be reading than doing the other things I was doing.

The situation isn’t likely to change anytime soon so I think I will have to become a little more selective in what I request. But on to the book…

Continue reading ““Mudlarking” by Lara Maiklem”

“A Tapestry Of Treason” by Anne O’Brien

Thanks to HQ and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

This book is set during a really rather fascinating period of British History, the period which formed the bedrock of the later War of the Roses. The year is 1399 and Constance of York, Lady Despenser, King Richard’s cousin decides to stir the decidedly risky pot of courtly intrigue.

Continue reading ““A Tapestry Of Treason” by Anne O’Brien”

“Commodus” by Simon Turney

cover164281-medium

 

Thanks to Orion and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review. 

It’s not very often that a Classics themed book appears on NetGalley but when they do, I hit that Request button with the power of a thousand fiery suns. I wasn’t familiar with Turney as a writer before reading this novel, but I’ve added Caligula to my Audible wish list on the strength of this novel. 

Continue reading ““Commodus” by Simon Turney”

“Superior” by Angela Saini

cover155188-medium

Thanks to HarperCollins UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review. 

Superior is an especially topical book considering the current political climate in the West. Through the election of Trump, the emergence of the alt-right, increasing nationalism and Brexit we are seeing a resurgence in discourse around race science. In this book Saini explores the past and current context of race science and dismantles some of the myths and assumptions that surround the issue of biological race and the problem of setting the benchmark of measuring humanity against white westerners.  

Continue reading ““Superior” by Angela Saini”

“Epic Continent” by Nicholas Jubber

Thanks to John Murray Press and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

This is a pretty cool idea for a book. The author goes on a personal odyssey, visiting the locations from some of the great European ‘epics’ – myths, legends, literature and folklore, whilst exploring his own life and the impact these tales still have on cultures and people today. What an awesome premise for a book.

Continue reading ““Epic Continent” by Nicholas Jubber”