“The Runaways” by Fatima Bhutto

Thanks to Penguin Books UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

I seem to be reading a lot of novels with multiple points of view lately so…here’s another one. The Runaways follows three members of the Pakistani community. Anita Rose, a resident of the Karachi slums, Monty, a jet setting rich kid and Sunny a second generation immigrant living in England. Unlike a number of multiple points of view novels I’ve read recently, the different points of view are distinct and I never had to force myself to remember who I was reading about. Similarly to other novels of this type, one character voice was stronger than that of the others, in this case that of Anita.

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“Orchid & The Wasp” by Caoilinn Hughes

I’ve been in a bit of a reading slump lately. I’ve had a virus I’ve been struggling to shake and my son has been teething and waking up throughout the night. Pile on an incredibly busy few weeks at work and I’ve got myself a little behind.

Thanks to Oneworld and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

Hmmm. An interesting book. Did I like it? I’m not really sure. I suppose I felt the same about it as I felt about it’s main character, Gael. Not easy to like but compelling all the same.

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“Internment” by Samira Ahmed

Thanksto Little Brown UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

This was a scary book. Scary because it was so utterly believable.

The story takes place in an America where Muslims are sent to domestic internment camps. Layla, a 17 year old Muslim, and her parents are sent to one such desert internment camp simply because of their faith. Layla soon chafes against her imprisonment and leads a resistance movement within the camp. She is aided by her Jewish boyfriend David, her new friend Ayesha, and Jake, a guard at the camp.

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“Bloodwitch” by Susan Dennard

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Thanks to Pan Macmillan and Netgalley for providing me with an Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

This is the third book in Dennard’s Witchlands series. The digital copy of the ARC itself was really muddled and difficult to read which hindered my reading comprehension at certain points. I think the file itself must have been corrupted in some way as some letters were missing and the text was mixed up. I’ll be buying a physical copy of it upon release though.

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“The Island of Sea Women” by Lisa See

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Thanks to Simon and Schuster and NetGalley for providing me with an Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

I’ve read a number of Lisa See’s books in the past so was excited to see that she has written a new novel. This story follows Young-Sook and Mi-Ja, two Haenyeo, Korean women who harvest the sea floor by free diving. I was familiar with real life Haenyeo stories beforehand and it was great to see a novel written about these fascinating women. The book is written from Young-Sook’s perspective and follows her life as a young girl in the 1940s through to 2008. The book flashes back and forward through time to allow the mysteries of the past to unfold. 

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“The Orphanage of Gods” by Helena Coggan

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Thanks to Hodder & Stoughton and NetGalley for providing me with an Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review. 

I’ve read a lot of commentary about this book in the blogging community, so I was looking forward to reading it. It seems like this book is really dividing opinions with some readers loving it and others hating it. I have a strange tendency in life to like things that other people don’t, so I was curious to see how what side of the debate I would fall on with this book.   

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“The Burning” by Laura Bates

Thanks to Simon and Schuster UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

When I heard that Laura Bates of Everyday Sexism was writing a novel, I was really excited to read it. Her work is often discussed in the school in which I teach and the website and Twitter feed are used by pupils when looking at issues around sexism, social media, gender bias and peer pressure. I was keen to see whether a fictional approach would be able to tie in with the topics we’ve explored already.

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“In the Night Wood” by Dale Bailey

Thanks to HarperCollins UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

First of all just look at that cover. LOOK AT IT. It is totally my aesthetic. If I saw it in a bookshop I’d buy it no matter what so, kudos to the designer.

This book follows the story of Charles and Erin Hayden. They move from North Caroline to rural Yorkshire upon receiving an old mansion as part of Erin’s inheritance. Cool right? Well…

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“Fierce Fragile Hearts” by Sara Barnard

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Thanks to Pan Macmillan and NetGalley for providing me with an Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

I’ve read some very disappointing contemporary YA novels lately, but I knew from the start that this book was going to be different. I haven’t read the author’s previous novel which concerns some of the same characters, but I don’t feel like I had to in order to appreciate this one. Continue reading ““Fierce Fragile Hearts” by Sara Barnard”

“Five Feet Apart” by Rachael Lippincott

Thanks to Simon and Schuster UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

This short YA novel follows the story of Stella and Will, two characters suffering from Cystic Fibrosis (or CF) who meet whilst undergoing treatment in hospital. The novel follows their burgeoning relationship and the struggles they both experience with their individual forms of CF. Continue reading ““Five Feet Apart” by Rachael Lippincott”