“Dignity” by Alys Conran

Thanks to Orion Publishing Group and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

I’ve been procrastinating on this review for a few days because I always seem to struggle more when writing positive reviews. I know I’m not alone in this but it’s weird, is it human nature to focus more on the negative? When I like something I tend to be quite effusive about it but “BUY THIS BOOK OMG IT’S SO GOOD” is a little less thoughtful than “I struggled with the characterisation”. Perhaps it’s because we tend to be more thoughtful when critiquing someone elses work? Anyhoo, I digress.

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“The Confessions of Frannie Langton” by Sara Collins

Thanks to Penguin Books and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

I can’t help but feel a little sorry for a debut author when their book is promoted as being similar to x or y. This particular book has been compared to both Alias Grace and Fingersmith. I can totally understand why publishers do this but, I think I’d find being compared to Margaret Atwood and Sarah Waters more than a little intimidating personally. It’s a lot for a debut novel to live up to and sets a certain expectation for the reader.

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“The True Queen” by Zen Cho

Thanks to Pan Macmillan and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

Malay Witches in Regency England? Yup, I hit the request button at the speed of light when I saw this was available for request. This kind of book is right up my alley: Eastern Cultural focus? Check. Supernatural creatures and themes? Check. A diverse, female focused cast of characters? Double check!

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“The Cold is in Her Bones” by Peternelle van Arsdale

Thanks to Simon and Schuster UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

So, I’ve spoken a bit before about my love for all things Classical and I’ve always been fascinated by Medusa. I remember in Primary School we once got to watch Clash of the Titans and I found the Medusa sequence utterly thrilling. Over the years I picked up on the fact that what happened to Medusa was utter bullshit.

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“Internment” by Samira Ahmed

Thanksto Little Brown UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

This was a scary book. Scary because it was so utterly believable.

The story takes place in an America where Muslims are sent to domestic internment camps. Layla, a 17 year old Muslim, and her parents are sent to one such desert internment camp simply because of their faith. Layla soon chafes against her imprisonment and leads a resistance movement within the camp. She is aided by her Jewish boyfriend David, her new friend Ayesha, and Jake, a guard at the camp.

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“The Burning” by Laura Bates

Thanks to Simon and Schuster UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

When I heard that Laura Bates of Everyday Sexism was writing a novel, I was really excited to read it. Her work is often discussed in the school in which I teach and the website and Twitter feed are used by pupils when looking at issues around sexism, social media, gender bias and peer pressure. I was keen to see whether a fictional approach would be able to tie in with the topics we’ve explored already.

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