“Stepsister” by Jennifer Donnelly

Thanks to Hot Key Books and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

This book has been getting some really rave reviews so I was more than ready to hop right onto that hype train. The story has an interesting premise, it’s a sequel to Cinderella that follows the ‘ugly’ stepsisters after the events of the original story.

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“A Thousand Ships” by Natalie Haynes

Thanks to Pan Macmillan and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

Every so often a book appears on NetGalley that makes me slam the Request button with extreme prejudice whilst muttering fervent prayers to the publishing gods. This was one of those books and I was so excited and chuffed when I was approved for it.

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“Dignity” by Alys Conran

Thanks to Orion Publishing Group and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

I’ve been procrastinating on this review for a few days because I always seem to struggle more when writing positive reviews. I know I’m not alone in this but it’s weird, is it human nature to focus more on the negative? When I like something I tend to be quite effusive about it but “BUY THIS BOOK OMG IT’S SO GOOD” is a little less thoughtful than “I struggled with the characterisation”. Perhaps it’s because we tend to be more thoughtful when critiquing someone elses work? Anyhoo, I digress.

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“The Confessions of Frannie Langton” by Sara Collins

Thanks to Penguin Books and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

I can’t help but feel a little sorry for a debut author when their book is promoted as being similar to x or y. This particular book has been compared to both Alias Grace and Fingersmith. I can totally understand why publishers do this but, I think I’d find being compared to Margaret Atwood and Sarah Waters more than a little intimidating personally. It’s a lot for a debut novel to live up to and sets a certain expectation for the reader.

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