“Antigone Rising” by Helen Morales

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Thanks to Headline and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

I was really excited to read this book when I first heard about it. I am currently doing my Masters in Classical Studies and I teach it at High School level too so anything which prompts deeper thinking or poses interesting questions I am 100% here for.

The book is split into eight chapters covering topics ranging from violence against women, war, dieting and body image, gender fluidity and…Beyonce. So far, so interesting.

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“Red River Girl” by Joanna Jolly

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Thanks to Little Brown Book Group UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review. 

Unless you’ve had your head in the sand the past few years, you’ve probably heard about the rampant abuse and murder of indigenous Canadian women and girls, if you’re interested in true crime at least. Despite the media focus, it is clear that the violence persists, and this book focuses particularly on the death of one young girl, Tina Fontaine.   

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“Djinn Patrol on the Purple Line” by Deepa Anappara

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Thanks to Random House UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review. 

If I think about my reading history, I’ve probably read more books set in India than any other country and I usually really enjoy Indian own voices books. When thinking about it a little more, I realise that very few have been from the point of view of a child so this was an interesting perspective.  

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“The Far Field” by Madhuri Vijay

Thanks to Grove Press and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

Shalini, a young woman from Bangalore, goes on a journey to a remote mountain village in Kashmir to try and track down a mysterious man from her family’s past. Whilst living there, Shalini experiences the past and current impacts of Kashmiri politics and conflict and uncovers the connection these have with her past, and her complex relationship with her deceased mother.

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“Superior” by Angela Saini

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Thanks to HarperCollins UK and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review. 

Superior is an especially topical book considering the current political climate in the West. Through the election of Trump, the emergence of the alt-right, increasing nationalism and Brexit we are seeing a resurgence in discourse around race science. In this book Saini explores the past and current context of race science and dismantles some of the myths and assumptions that surround the issue of biological race and the problem of setting the benchmark of measuring humanity against white westerners.  

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“Jailbirds” by Mim Skinner

Thanks to Seven Dials and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

Although I am not teaching the subject currently, I started my teaching career as a Modern Studies teacher. By far my favourite topic to teach was Crime and the Law and I always found that resources and information relating specifically to women’s incarceration were thin on the ground. If only I’d had this book available then. Stats are one thing, but real stories and perspectives are invaluable. I have moved on from Modern Studies teaching, but I’ll be sure to recommend this book to the Modern Studies teachers in my school.

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“The New Silk Roads” by Peter Frankopan

Thanks to Bloomsbury and NetGalley for the Advance Review Copy in exchange for an honest review.

This review is terribly late. In my defence, I was approved for it a good while after publication date. I also own both editions of The Silk Roads (the children’s version is absolutely fabulous) and bought the audiobook too so I hope I’ve made it up to Professor Frankopan.

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